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The Empedoclean vision of the world follows that the world is composed of elements, and these elements bind and divide, and that such phenomena lead to the creation of new creations. The world is thus constructed of the elements, and these elements stand to be, according to Empedocles, earth, fire, air, and water. These elements lead to the physical construction of all that is, and from this physical reality an ecology forms that shall seek to alter itself, and so Empedocles entreats upon a rudimentary thought, whose nature stands to be that the formation of natural affairs is ever on the march, that is to say, that nature is subject to change, and from this change new things come into being, while older things are eliminated. This ever-persistent change is marked by two principle forces, and it is by the workings of these two forces that the elements bind and break from one another, and these two forces according to Empedocles are love and strife. 

These two principle forces are the ones that are responsible for the, “unification and separation,” of the world, as according to Empedocles. Yet, the four basic substances, as Empedocles terms them, are not given to change nor do they suffer any form of destruction, but instead it is what they birth when bonded or shaped together, or apart from one another, that gives way to existence and death. That is to say, that the elements themselves are immortal, and they do not give way to specific changes, according to Empedocles, but instead once they engage with another element, or substance, do they then create a new object, and it is this object that finds mortality, but the elements themselves are immortal in both character and form. Empedocles states this principle when he proclaims, “there is coming to not a single one of all mortal things, nor is there any end of destructive death, but only mixture, and separation of what is mixed, and nature (phusis) is the name given to them by humans.” So, each of these elements retains their specific identity and integrity, though they may give way to the creation of new entities, they themselves are not subject to change, according to Empedocles. 

In Empedocles’ vision the world is composed of the elements earth, fire, air, and water. The binding and dividing of these elements bring about the physical construction of all that is; things exist in a state of constant change in which the elements bind to and break from one another and thus new things come into being while some things cease to exist. This ever-persistent change is marked by two principal forces: love and strife. 

According to Empedocles, these two principal forces are responsible for the “unification and separation” of the world. Yet the elements themselves – the four basic substances, as Empedocles terms them – are not subject to change or destruction; it is their bonding and separating that create new objects and destroy existing ones. Empedocles states this principle when he proclaims, “there is coming to not a single one of all mortal things, nor is there any end of destructive death, but only mixture, and separation of what is mixed, and nature (phusis) is the name given to them by humans”: Although the elements mix and form new entities, each element retains its identity and integrity.